Frederick T. Wawra, AIA NCARB Participates in the American Institute of Architects / New Jersey 150 Year Anniversary


Frederick T. Wawra speaks to students at Jefferson Township Middle School as part of statewide education program.


As part of American Institute of Architects (AIA) 150 year anniversary of shaping American communities – and lives, the New Jersey Chapter had 150 members attend Schools to discuss architecture and its impact in the design of livable communities throughout the State. Architect Frederick T. Wawra, AIA NCARB spoke to students at Jefferson Township Middle School.


“I am proud to participate in AIA/New Jersey’s 150 School Initiative,” said Fred Wawra, an architect at Fox Architectural Design, PC in Wharton. “I am pleased to be able to go to the Middle School and speak with the students and staff about architecture. I have previously spoken to students at the High School regarding the architectural profession and will be doing the same in the near future at Dover High School.”


Frederick T. Wawra, AIA NCARB spoke at the Jefferson Township Middle School, on Wednesday, March 28, 2007. He provided two presentations to a total of approximately 45 interested students.


The New Jersey celebration of AIA 150 will include New Jersey recognition of National Architects Week, 150 Schools initiative and also the production and distribution of the 150 Best Building and Places Initiative.


“Over the last 150 years, AIA members have used the design process to help individuals, companies and government officials realize a vision for beautiful, safe, and livable communities,” said Edward N. Rothe, FAIA/AIA NJ 150 Champion. “This year AIA/New Jersey has members championing, organizing or participating in many of the plan celebratory events, such as AIA/NJ 150 Schools.”


The AIA was founded in 1857 when 13 architects got together to create an organization that would promote the scientific and practical perfection of its members and elevate the standing of the profession. Until this point, anyone who wished to call him, or herself, an architect could do so. AIA/New Jersey President Jerome L. Eben, AIA said,” Everyday AIA/New Jersey leaders and members build on the work of the original 13 members, in an effort to improve the quality of life for the citizens of our State. It makes perfect sense for our membership to visit our schools to inform our children of important mission of architects.”


150 Schools is an education based program. As part of the program, 150 AIA/New Jersey members, including Fred, will be going to schools in their area to talk with students and teachers about the importance of architecture in our daily lives and the work of architects in general.


“Nothing is more important than the education of future generations regarding the importance of architecture and design,” said Martin Santini, FAIA/New Jersey Champion of the 150 Schools Initiative. “The 150 School Initiatives will educate thousands of children and adults throughout our state regarding the importance architecture,” said Ben Lee, AIA/New Jersey Champion of the 150 Schools Initiative.


AIA-NJ, New Jersey’s chapter of the national AIA was formed in 1900, uniting the architects throughout the state by merging the AIA Chapter with the New Jersey Society of Architects. Through public education and outreach, community redevelopment and government advocacy and partnerships, AIA-NJ protects the professional interests of its over 2000 member architects while working to create a responsive public environment for architectural and redevelopment projects.


Fred also added, “I was lucky enough to discover the profession at a young age, and I hope that my presentations will spark interest that might help create the next generation of architects”